Angel Island History Essay

Question 1

Formerly an immigration station on the West Coast, the Island turned to a park one in San Francisco Bay in 1997. Between 1910 and 1940, it was a gateway into America for a million from 80 counties. Most of the immigrants were primarily seeking the opportunity, freedom, and fortune of the American dream. Angel Island was purposefully built to enforce laws that specifically excluded Chinese and other Asian immigrants from entering the country. However, some of the immigrants were also detained within Angel Island but some of the detainees on the island went on to become notable figures in America (Yung 1).

Question 2

Americans are dependent. This is because Americans built Angel Island to enforce laws that were specifically excluded Chinese and other Asian immigrants from the country. The Angel Island Immigration Station turned away several immigrants from the country and deported thousands of U.S. residents who were also considered a risk to the nation.
Americans are Brutal. The persons who were working at the Angel Island were very ruthless on the immigrants who were detained at the stationed in Angel Island. This is very much evident from the poem that was written by one of the detained people at the station. The writer of the poem complained about the issues of humiliating medical examination, days of intense interrogation and weeks or months of confinement.

Question 3

There are some contentions that Angel Island is not that bad, that it houses other groups of immigrants, that it is not racist because other non-Chinese groups were kept there for processing immigration purposes. It is justified that Angel Island is not bad. The island’s immigration officers turned away U.S residents considered as a risk to the nation or had entered the country after having used fraudulent papers. This is clear evidence that Angle Island was not bad and not racist.

Question 4

The last paragraph is about the complaints that the detainees were raising through the writing on the wall in the station at Angel Island. There were several voices complaining about the problems they were facing there as detainees. The poems also indicated that the detainees were yearning for a change. Although reforms were not immediate, they remained hopeful. The last paragraph also states that history is about the teller as the tale. There is a necessity to save and restore the Island. Restoration of the island will ensure the future generations can understand the experiences of certain groups of immigrants (Ganga 1).

 

Work Cited
Ganga, Maria. On Angel Island, the walls still talk. The Los Angeles Times. February 13, 2009.
Yung, Judy. Angel Islands’ history offers lessons on immigration policy. The Los Angeles Times.